fuck yeah lady writers

a blog that celebrates women wordsmiths

“I am still every age that I have been. Because I was once a child, I am always a child. Because I was once a searching adolescent, given to moods and ecstasies, these are still part of me, and always will be. This does not mean that I ought to be trapped or enclosed in any of these ages. The delayed adolescent, the childish adult, but that they are in me to be drawn on; to forget is a form of suicide. Far too many people misunderstand what putting away childish things means, and think that forgetting what it is like to think and feel and touch and smell and taste and see and hear like a three-year-old or a thirteen-year-old or a twenty-three-year-old means being grownup. When I’m with these people I, like the kids, feel that if this is what it means to be a grown-up, then I don’t ever want to be one. Instead of which, if I can retain a child’s awareness and joy, and be fifty-one, then I will really learn what it means to be grownup.”

—   Madeleine L’Engle (via halus)

(via halus-deactivated20110710)

kvetchlandia:

Louise Dahl-Wolfe     Writer Carson McCullers     1940
“she died of alcoholism
wrapped in a blanket
on a deck chair
on an ocean
steamer
all her books of 
terrified lonliness
all her books about 
the cruelty
of loveless love
were all that was left
of her
as the strolling vacationer
discovered her body
notified the captain
and she was quickly dispatched
to somewhere else 
on the ship
as everything
continued just
as she had written it.”  
Charles Bukowski, “Carson McCullers,” 2001

kvetchlandia:

Louise Dahl-Wolfe     Writer Carson McCullers     1940

“she died of alcoholism

wrapped in a blanket

on a deck chair

on an ocean

steamer

all her books of 

terrified lonliness

all her books about 

the cruelty

of loveless love

were all that was left

of her

as the strolling vacationer

discovered her body

notified the captain

and she was quickly dispatched

to somewhere else 

on the ship

as everything

continued just

as she had written it.”  

Charles Bukowski, “Carson McCullers,” 2001

Roseanne Barr: And I Should Know

“As a writer, rejection sometimes feels like someone telling me to shut up.”

—   Alana Noel Voth

“Happiness is the consequence of a personal effort. You fight for it, strive for it, insist upon it, and sometimes even travel around the world looking for it. You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestation of your own blessings.”

—   Elizabeth Gilbert - Eat, Pray, Love (via thinkingwishful)

(Source: beingkingly)

Favorite parts from Vulture's interview with Jennifer Egan.

katiebakes:

  • “Sometimes there’s a sense of the book being too hot, literally. It just feels hard for me to have a private experience of an artifact that is so spoken of, so much in the culture in a particular moment.”
  • “Again, I’m not really a Twitter person so to some degree this maelstrom was not something I experienced firsthand. I also happened to be on kind of an off-the-grid farm in New Hampshire with my kids when the whole thing erupted.”
  • “I didn’t feel the pressure that I might have if I had said, “Now I’m going to address the future. What will the future look like?” I just kind of followed the sky and looked around and imagined what was there.”
  • “Like if my iPod doesn’t work, I do not run. It is not an option.”
  • [Songs she’s been listening to lately]: “”Telephone” and “Let’s Dance,” especially “Telephone.” They’re not good songs, I know that, but it’s not really about quality.”
  • “One of the things that’s so fascinating about Adrian Leblanc’s book Random Family is that she never once uses the word “I.” And that’s a very radical extreme, because she was clearly deeply intertwined in these peoples’ lives.”
  • “It’s not like I thought it was impossible to do it, but it didn’t seem conceivable I would. I think part of it is, honestly, I think sometimes it’s hard to imagine things that haven’t happened already.”
  • “I just want to try and write another book in under five or six years.”
  • “I’m really out of it in the world of youngish actresses. I know that when I originally — this will show you how long ago I was writing about [flameout celebrity] Kitty Jackson — I was thinking of Cameron Diaz.”
jennyjanuary:

i made this thing yesterday while I was feeling blue. it helps to make art when I find it difficult to write. it says this true thing I wrote in my journal the other day:
some days, I don’t feel strong enough to be a writer to turn inward and explore my natural shadows some days all I can really do is close my eyes and stay in bed and try to cultivate the strength I need to continue the excavation of my secrets

jennyjanuary:

i made this thing yesterday while I was feeling blue. it helps to make art when I find it difficult to write. it says this true thing I wrote in my journal the other day:

some days, I don’t feel strong enough to be a writer
to turn inward and explore my natural shadows
some days all I can really do
is close my eyes
and stay in bed
and try to cultivate the strength I need
to continue the excavation of my secrets

On Being a Woman Writer

W. W. Norton: April Bernard on Sylvia Plath

wwnorton:

Plath, from the minute I read her, I thought she was great. I didn’t think it was bad news at all. In fact, I couldn’t reconcile the knowledge that she killed herself with the poems because the poems seemed to be so alive. I thought she was the most vibrant, wonderful person in the world, why…

(Source: postroadmag.com)

I usually get into bed with a novel and our Post-it-studded Times. I try to read the Times thoroughly and carefully at the end of the day. I’m fully aware that the news is two days old by then, and of course in certain areas I’ll be way ahead of it, but it’s the depth that I enjoy, and I find that it serves me well when the news isn’t fresh. The depth is twofold; on the one hand, I want to try to understand what’s going on, rather than just know what’s going on. On the other, I’m always trying to feed the unconscious part of me that’s scheming away—often without my conscious knowledge—at fiction writing. I never know what material that fiction writing part will end up needing or using, but I do like to let it chew through the Times on a daily basis.


After I’m done with that, I read fiction. Reading fiction is purely fun for me—and luckily it’s also something that feeds the work I do. Yesterday I finished Meg Wolitzer’s The Uncoupling, which I thoroughly enjoyed, and I’m about to start Jessica Hagedorn’s Toxicology, which I’ve heard great things about. I think the last thing I read that got profoundly under my skin was Emma Donohue’s Room, which I read a couple of weeks ago. I thought about it as I read a news story (in the Times, of course!) about the guilty plea by that couple in California who kidnapped an 11-year-old girl, Jaycee Dugard, 20 years ago. They imprisoned her in the backyard and she had two daughters by her captor before she was discovered. Because of Room, I read the news story with a sense of resonant personal knowledge that I’ve never felt about those stories of captivity before. The feeling reminded me of why fiction is critical to me—more than nonfiction, and I say that as a journalist! Nonfiction expands my knowledge, but fiction broadens my experience. Reading the news story, I thought: I’m so glad to have read Room.

—   Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Egan dishes on her media diet. Read the rest at The Atlantic Wire (via theatlantic)